Hold

I love my son most when we are alone and he is quiet. I hold him–a heft and thickness to his limbs now that surprises me though I’ve watched him grow, inspected him even, twelve years now–against my chest and the ache of loving him burns through my center like I’ve downed a tequila shot and eaten the lime whole. I want to fold him back into my belly, return him to his point of origin. I could be his chrysalis. I could rebirth him and give him a chance. I could rebirth him and give myself another chance. It’s not romantic, but this special kind of motherhood rarely is. It’s pulsing blood in my jaw and nerves revealed only in the twitch of my eyelid. It’s still shit and drool and too-sharp nails and sometimes bites and lots of shame, and twelve years of tiredness that makes my body ache and all I can do is lay myself on the floor and wait to feel myself again. I’ve read that the center of a star is held together only by the force of its own gravity.

Hysteria

I lift heavy weights because I can no longer lift my son. I’ve grown stronger over the past year: my quads have a stone-like quality under the skin and fat. I think of myself as an ice cream cake. Hard center, soft exterior. I enjoy the bulge in my bicep. I like to flex and find the crease between bicep and deltoid. But I still cannot lift him. I work at the gym for a month or more and I injure myself. Elbow, wrist, knee, back, and have to pull back my training for awhile until that injured part of my body heals, and then it’s up the hill again. But I still can’t lift him. He is now 100 pounds which is a lot but still little, and yet like the proverbial sack of potatoes, N doesn’t know how to use his own body to help me. I think of figure skating pairs, the man lifts the woman, but it is the woman’s core, the woman’s complimentary tensity, that assists in the lift and lightens the man’s load. N just hangs, an armful of wet towels. There isn’t one moment of hysteria; it’s a slow drip of hand-numbing anxiety: this could be it. No matter how hard I train, how strong I become, I might never be able to lift him again.

And again I can see her on the distant shore, the maybe other me who might decide not to feed her son in order to keep him small, in order to deny him a growing body because his mind does not keep apace. She thinks of him as a baby, she thinks of him as a toddler, she thinks of him even last year when he was eleven, when she could still lift him. No, that’s not right: she wishes for him to be again eleven. Is this empathy for the woman who tosses her child off a bridge, or the man who engages a shotgun to keep the future from ever arriving for his child and then himself? Is my fear of the future and my inability to keep lifting my spirits, my hope, just hysteria? There was a time when it was still ok for him to go and play on the playground, because he was small. There was a time when it was still ok for him to climb into a shopping cart and ride instead of walk. He is small for his age, but it is only a matter of time until he is taller, thicker than she is, stronger, and she fears that’s when the hyena she hides will burst from behind her hyoid and devour all hope. She is certain that when he is 14 and 17 and 22, he will still want to play on the playground, ride in a shopping cart: it makes her sick how his world will get smaller as he grows, it makes her pulse with a keening need to keep him to stay small. For there to be symbiosis between his mind and his body. She is a mother who might do whatever it takes to stop time.

So instead I try to grow. The longer I can lift him, the longer he can stay little, and there is little chance I will become her.

Last Night

 

The Mother Bed

Last night I put my arms around him as he lay in bed, eyes on his tablet, knees pulled up to his chest. Such long legs, getting thicker by the day, but I can still see his baby self in his skin. I’ve given him his seizure medications; I’ve washed his GTube insertion, applied Desitin, a square of gauze. I know I should tend it twice a day, but once is all the time I’ve got. I’ve dosed him with Melatonin in hopes he sleeps the night away, no tossing and turning, no cries in the night, no hours of wakefulness that have come in swaths since he was an infant.

We still share a bed even though he is eleven. You may find that inappropriate. Certainly some people do. Sure, he hasn’t had a seizure in a year and a half, thanks to the nutrition via his GTube we assume, so maybe he’d be safe on his own, but how can I know? Always our bedsharing was a necessity born out of fear. His seizures most often happened as he moved between levels of sleep. They were silent and too long, not violent and quick as most people imagine, as is often shown on TV. Instead, he just grew stiff, unresponsive. While I’d have loved to believe some kind of inner instinct would rouse me to some unusual silence across a hall, real life doesn’t often work that way. Otherwise there would be no death by middle-of-the-night fire, or while-they-slept burglaries, or children who go missing as though taken in the rapture.

What about your husband, your marriage, people ask me. And maybe I can’t explain that this is not a zero-sum game: both of us benefit from our son staying alive. The fear of SUDEP, which sounds like a cold medicine, but is how people with epilepsy sometimes die, still lingers. I have always been afraid that the one time I look away, he will suddenly disappear. Not his body, but his life. Evaporation. Ether. One time he had a seizure and I was alone with him and his lips turned blue and he stopped moving entirely, and that’s a thing that happened, and reason is no match for memory.

So bedsharing became the default, but is now a necessity because I fear the exhaustion that switching him to his own bed will bring on. When he wakes up at night, he wants a comforting hand on his back. Or a change of clothes if he pees through his night-time pull-up. Or for help finding his comfort blanket. I have grown better at falling back asleep after such disruptions, but rarely do I get a full night. When we begin to train him toward some additional independence, surely I will get even less. You may think that’s selfish, but eleven years is a long time to be tired, and sanity is a commodity I’ve learned to hoard.

I told someone today that I’d never had a driving need to be a mother, and the decision to have a baby had been more strategy than longing. On the verge of thirty, in a happy marriage with a man who deserved to be a father, I asked myself this: on my death bed, what I would regret more, not having children or having them? The answer seemed clear at the time, and so we did. (Before you ask me, we stopped at one, because he has been enough work and worry for two.)

When I hear stories of women who suffer due to childlessness, I can’t find a way to put myself in their shoes. When I hear women celebrate motherhood, they are speaking a language that sounds like my own, but the meaning gets lost in the distance between their mouths and my ear. I have a friend who has prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize faces, and that seems as good a metaphor here as any. It’s like I recognize the individual features of our common experience, but I can’t put them together to form a picture that is identifiable to me.

Simply, I don’t know what it’s like to be purely glad to have had a child. I sound cold, I know. But I can’t claim joy at having brought a child into the world who will struggle as mine struggles. That would require me to go to great length of Pollyana-ish denial, and I have far too much guilt for that. Yes, I am a better person. More compassionate, more selfless, more multi-faceted. And yes, he perfect in his imperfections. And I do often wonder when thinking about belonging, about helping him find a place in the world, if our culture is more the problem than his disabilities are. Sometimes I try to challenge people in rethinking the way they think about seizures, about special needs, that euphemism I have grown to abhor. But I would trade all of those personal gains, all of my drop-in-the-bucket activism, for having given life to a child who will be able to talk, to read, to shop, to drive, to work.

You see, I am ambivalent about being a mother, and as my child grows bigger but doesn’t truly age, I expect my feelings to remain complex on the matter. But after years of chastising myself, I now know this: it is possible to hold these two truths in my heart at the same time. There is nothing I love more than this child who I would never have decided to birth had he not appeared to me and bade me love him, like a stray at the door whose scars and ferocity are a lesson, not a reason to send it back in the rain.

I love my son most when we are quiet and I hold him in my arms and my heart, and the ache of loving him burns through me like I’ve downed a tequila shot and eaten the whole lime both. That’s not very romantic, but the visceral rarely is. Motherhood rarely is. For me, it is still poop and drool and too-sharp nails and sometimes bites and lots of embarrassment over his public behavior, and always, always, tiredness. My pride cringes as I tell you we still share the same bed. But I would take a hundred more years of all of those struggles, ironically to outlive my child whom I have always feared would die, because I have never been so afraid to leave someone I have always be destined leave.

 

In the Beginning

First, I tried ticks, their bloated bodies like blisters,
round bellies, black blood splats on the sidewalk, burst
by bicycle wheels. Then leeches, when I was ten, feet
damp in the well of the boat, water splatter as the motor
roared, slick bodies, slick, bold mouths groping, gaining
purchase. I couldn’t leave them long enough to bleed me

dry. Picking scabs only stung. Shaving legs with dull blades
run up my shin, skin shallow divots welled with wet, more
plasma than platelets, like runoff in the narrow ditches
framing the fallow fields of my father’s farm. I slid
a sharper blade along the inside of my thigh, coke-line fine,
skin paper-thin and soft like the belly of a bee. The blood

ran in rivulets, dingy windows streaked with clean. I lack
the courage to go further, palpate the pocket of my pelvis,
find the femoral vein and knife-slice it like a steak. Instead,
I write this poem, imagine I was proud, or foolish, dive deep
into this wreck, pick my bones, such meager meat. Still these
animal-lungs inflate the cage around my stupid tender heart.

Disaster Preparedness

We tell ourselves stories in order to live.
~Joan Didion

I almost lost my husband, somewhere
between here and home. It’s like I put
him in my pocket without realizing
there was a hole in the stitching. Really
he could be anywhere. I retread my steps,
scanning the ground left to right until
my vision blurred and I thought maybe
I was crying but instead I was tired.

It’s been hours but maybe days since
I last held his hand in my hand. Since
then I’ve bought a condo, a Mini, hired
a nanny. I’ve pre-paid a dog walker
so I’m never in demand. I’ve got people
aplenty, and I’m certain with enough
money we will be all right. It’s funny
now I am without him, it’s like he
was never here. So when I found him
waiting at the corner–we were to meet
here at half-past five!–I’m not sure
what to do with a husband. I’d gotten
accustomed to being a widow if only
for a moment or two. The abandonment
felt like a gust rushing the open door,
scattering my plans like stacked papers
turned to airplanes, to confetti.
The shock of cold air ran sharp along
my future and swept it clean.

But soon I shivered, wanting to lay down
behind him, pull up my shins against
his back, stoke the ember near-dormant between
the half-shells of our old bodies. I return
my purchases–no warranty for wishes–
and hand him the keys to our house
where I keep the needle and the thread.

Cosmogony

To see him lying there, bloated and nearly naked due to feverishness, tubes like exterior veins protruding out of his neck in a knot of grotesque jewelry, a patch of dark blood–had it gushed?–spread out and dried on his chest, a thrum thrust through my torso like when a plane breaks the sound barrier. He turned to me when I arrived, when I said, “Wow,” careful to keep a certain amount of lightness in my voice, like when you slip on the ice and fall hard but assure everyone concerned that you’re just fine, and he said, “I’m sorry, honey.”

I think at that point he probably knew it was bad since the machine those tubes attached him to was removing his blood, cleaning it, and returning it, in an effort to quickly reduce the number of white blood cells which had been replicating unchecked in his blood. A science teacher, a teacher of biology and chemistry, certainly he knew. But he is also a pragmatist with a healthy shot of optimism. In other words, he’ll face what he has to face, but he won’t think the worst until it’s absolutely proven to be happening. Then it’s a matter of science; luck hasn’t much to do with it.

The women from the blood center who worked the machine, who showed me the bags of his blood, both red and white, mentioned chemo to one another. I didn’t let on that I’d heard, but soon I went out into the hallway to find the hematologist and suggested they make an effort to talk to him about the chemo since he had not been told directly that he had anything that necessitated such treatment. I said all this without so much as a crack in my voice. She was unwilling to commit, to declare it was cancer, to say more than that they suspected a form of leukemia, because the lab results weren’t in yet. But she promised to have the resident stop by and explain what they’d learned as soon as she could track him down.

I went to his bedside, and asked if they’d told him they were going to start chemo, that it was likely leukemia. He said no. He stared up at the ceiling. Tears pooled in his eyes. And then they were gone. I told his parents when they arrived–they drove from Minnesota on a feeling that things were not all they appeared to be, parents who had already lost a son to cancer–, that it was likely leukemia. His mother shook her head, said it might not be, that the tests might reveal a less devastating diagnosis, but I was sure, just as I’d known there was something wrong with our son’s development before anyone else believed it could be true.

The resident explained to us what Acute Myeloid Leukemia was. He used simple pictures on a white board to illustrate what had happened in Mark’s body before we could know it was happening. My memory of these moments is solid–I see the room, his rough sketches, and hear the resident’s voice, a reassuring Indian sing-song, clearly–but I’ve turned the information around in my head so many times, trying to apply some sort of logic to the incredible, that I’m afraid each time I speak that I’m repeating some laughable interpretation of the facts like a game of telephone.

As I understand it, a chromosome went wrong and one rogue cell started birthing premature white blood cells which then replicated more premature white blood cells, ad infinitum, driving the platelets and red blood cells out of the neighborhood that was his bone marrow. And because immature cells can’t do the work that mature blood cells can, his immune system was an inadequate barrier against any kind of illness. The cause is a gene mutation, a mutinous enzyme, a scratch on the record, that caused his cellular production to go awry. If left untreated, the immature white blood cells would proliferate until he is dead. Because this new chromosomal error is uneditable, they must clean out his bone marrow and replace it with another person’s.

Some leukemia survivors regard their bone marrow transplant to be a rebirth. They take pictures of themselves celebrating their new birthday. Some report changes in their bodies–gluten intolerance, overly-sensitive skin, a lingering fatigue. Some make vague references to not feeling quite themselves. But I can’t help but fear, in a kind of wondrous disbelief that the best science fiction engenders, that the man I married, whom I have lived with for the past 20 years, will not, at the end of this odyssey, be the same. Is this the ultimate test of nature versus nurture? Creationism versus evolution?

Our son’s neurological disorder is undiagnosed. The closest we get is to say he has a seizure disorder, but there is no answer to the question: why him? There is no cause determined, no prognosis predicted. The geneticists and the neurologists and the epileptologists and the other specialists have looked at his test results, the scans of his brain, the vials of blood and spinal fluid, the space between his eyes, the shape of his fingernails, and found nothing to explain why he is as delayed as he is. Is he–are we?—just unlucky? Perhaps the world would be a friendlier place for him and for me if we had an explanation for the idiopathic symptoms that plague his development and his safety. Maybe we could put the questions to rest–Is it something I did?–but then what good has that done us in Mark’s case? Leukemia is something that makes sense to doctors; it is an affliction that has a rote protocol. But it doesn’t mean we don’t ask the same questions: why him? why us? what happened?

Life strikes. Bang. Mark’s cancer was like a car crash without the car. One day he was home, then the next he was beginning a month in the hospital, the start of a six month process toward getting cured, and maybe a two year process to become himself again. And yet, I took it in stride. Maybe it was shock. Maybe it was the Zoloft I’d been taking for a few years since my anxiety over my son’s health and special needs had turned into constant high wire walking. Maybe it was our son’s recent 3-week hospitalization over the previous Christmas and New Years that had prepared me for another long haul, another effort in compartmentalization, the practice of segmenting my strife from my life.

Because that’s what you do when you abruptly–is there any other way?–learn that your husband has cancer and treatment begins even before either of you has time to prepare. There was no choosing, no strategy, no warning that I would suddenly become a single parent of our special needs child, the primary money-earner, as well as the grateful, if begrudging, hostess to the constant stream of family members and friends and child caregivers and dog walkers and house cleaners who offered their assistance. Every one of the 25 days he was in the hospital, I kept it together. The gun had gone off, the race had begun, the ground moved beneath us, and we had no choice but to run, a marathon and a sprint both. Exertion and fear of stopping forward movement drove every decision, every action.

Most people picture The Big Bang as just that, a big bang. Like a spark and a flame that suddenly brought the universe into being. Energy makes sense. Flipping the lightswitch makes sense. But if the universe truly began not from a bang, but from intense pressure that literally pressed the world into being, then how? I suppose it’s why we look to God; the answers are so minor compared to the wonders of the world, the wonders of blood, the white and the red. One day, long before we knew Mark had cancer, something happened and suddenly? He had cancer.

And maybe there are times in a person’s life that are so combustible that you are fused into another version of yourself. My husband may earn a new life by accepting life from another person, but perhaps he already is becoming someone else. Perhaps it doesn’t take blood to renew the spirit. And perhaps it doesn’t take God either. Perhaps the extreme pressure he is under will change him regardless of the transplant, of the noncancerous cells recreating in his body minutes, days, weeks, and months after. And perhaps the same is true for myself. I wonder, after so much pressure, how much of my previous self is still there? How much of me is memory? And, maybe I wonder, how many times can a person be recreated before the pressure becomes smothering and the light just dies out.

Abandon

My thoughts are a wild pony, tethered
with ropes looped around its neck, tied
at all angles to the encircling fence line,
muscles flexing and nostrils snorting. Attempts
to calm incite, to woo infuriate. The pony
wants to run wild, to rut. The pony
wants to beat its hooves on the expanse
of green that is the mountainside.

The pony does not know the hunger, the dirth
of food and water that would seduce
it into acquiescence, but fear thrums
in its already-tough heart. Fear of losing
the undomesticated thrill of prancing
about a surprising tuft of sweet grass,
of chasing the wind as it crests the hill,
carrying with it a scent of rain.

Within its roiling gut the pony senses it
must not wander the world at its own whims,
but let the ropes slack, hide its bloom, fold
itself tidily within the horizon, accept
the trough of water, a bucket of feed.
My thoughts bow too, an eye on the limits
of love, like the pony bows its thick neck
under the hesitant stroke of kindness.