On the Surface

Mark is hosting Dungeons and Dragons tonight. Since taking disability after cancer treatment, D&D is Mark’s most effective treatment against the depression that can sneak up on him if he doesn’t arm himself with a purpose. Noah likes to sit with the gamers (Noah signs “friends” by alternating his index fingers, laying one over the other) at the card tables set up on the back porch. When the players laugh, Noah laughs, though he doesn’t understand what they are saying, why what they are saying is funny. Occasionally he takes a turn rolling the dice, but usually he watches his iPad, one ear on the conversation, waiting for words he recognizes, waiting for laughter.

Tonight Noah has been given a stack of blank copier paper and a blue highlighter. He bends over his work like a jeweler inspecting a tray of diamonds. His nose almost touches the paper, he is both so intent but also so almost-blind. We still don’t understand his vision issues. He is significantly near-sighted, but it also seems being close to a screen or book helps focus his eyes, still the nystagmus that makes his eyes flicker and dodge. A variety of examinations by a variety of experts have yielded no concrete answers, no applicable strategies. Some tell us to try glasses; some say glasses won’t really help and will only confuse his adapting perceptions. Noah can’t tell us much. He just adjusts.

I have walked by the door to the porch several times to check if he’s being disruptive to the game, but he is sitting quietly next to Mark, diligently drawing. I post a picture on Facebook of him in such studious pose, label it: Dungeon Master’s Apprentice. The picture gets many likes. But that captured moment is like so many: on the face of it, Noah is accomplishing something that looks so like what other children are doing. I post a picture of him riding a horse like he is taking a lesson, but it is hippotherapy. I post a picture of us at the pool, but after years of lessons he still cannot swim and we stay in the shallower end. I post a video of Noah ‘running’ the 50 yard dash at a track and field event for his school district’s special needs children. He crosses the finish line though he comes in last, and I am proud because he mostly stayed in his lane, didn’t fall, and ran the whole length without an adult to guide him. But that is not competition; that is participation. And for us, it is enough, but it isn’t what it appears to be.

When I share pictures like these, usually adorned with a clever quip or positive message, I am sharing my son, and my love for my son, and our adventures as a family, with my friends and our family and many acquaintances. This is as it should be. But each time I share these pictures I am also lying. The lie is the one I tell myself in trying to convince myself that my heart doesn’t ache with sadness over the limitations of Noah’s accomplishments documented as celebrations.

I know I am not alone in telling this lie. Social media is full of them. Lies of omission told by the abused, the abusers, the lost, the lonely, the insecure, the in-debt, and the unexceptional. What we present is not what we are. What we present is only what we wish for.

At 9pm I decide it’s time to retrieve Noah from the porch despite his diligent tasking. His face and hands are littered in blue highlighter graffiti. He grabs for his stack of papers, maybe 7 or 8 sheets, says, “Wook!”, proud of his art. I oooh and ahh, and I try so very hard to ignore that every sheet is covered with roughly-drawn circles, the only shape in 13 years he has learned to draw. Pages and pages of almost-circles.

There should be a word for this feeling of almost. Bittersweet feels too tender, a word for reverie. I want a word that is pride and sorrow intertwined. I want a word, a fresh addition to the limits of language, so I can claim this state. At the same time, I berate myself, think a better person–a better mother–would have by now shed her sorrow, managed her disappointment, and internalized the optimistic messaging she posts along with her Facebook photos. I adore my child, and I am so proud of his half-words, and small gains, and his pages of almost-circles, but I too remain almost-complete, my mother-heart more break than burst.

In Iowa (Two Ways)

My writing instructor at the festival said a write finds form by the process of writing, can trust the creative process to yield the shape and pattern words should assume. I wonder if love is the same? If the act of loving reveals the shape of that love.

My love for my son is warm like hot honey tea, a belly-filled feeling, not a shape, unless the shape is the shape of me. I loved my mother: the curve of her tidy nails, coffee-smell teeth, white stomach folds, each petechia and freckle and insertion point of every insulin-streaming needle. I cannot re-love her now, yet still feel the pattern of her prayers like fingertip taps on my back. She drew me toward sleep by drawing shapes on my night-gowned back–a frying pan with eggs and bacon, our cat, a heart. My father, his hands. My husband a house. Not our house, but the home he builds around me. When I leave the door open in a rush, he never changes the locks.

I am greedy for love. Maybe it’s age, but I want to try love out on everyone. If I can leave love along with signing my name on the waiter’s receipt, I will. I will two-hand grasp the odd man’s outstretched hand after briefly meeting. Meet a stranger’s gaze with a grin. Maybe I’ll just repeat I love I love I love I love I love I love until my heart picks up the rhythm, picks out a desire line, beats one foot in front of another down a path leads me there to love, but I suspect will lead here to where I am. — What is a vessel if water refuses to fill it? — leads me to circle only myself.

Year Thirteen

3/4/18 | Today you turned thirteen years old.

For the second year in a row, you have strep throat on your birthday, so it is fortunate I didn’t plan that big party I have imagined but never held. You lack the ability to tell time, to know what a minute, an hour, a day, a year is, and so I am able to squirm off the hook. A few days ago, while you played in the bathtub with your cars and toy bears, I whispered to your dad about how I’m disappointed in myself, how I let my own ambivalence about your birthday prevent me from providing you with a birthday event you would delight in–trampolines, bowling, maybe visiting dogs at the Humane Society–, because you never realize what you are missing. Some days I think I should not be forgiven for the ways I skirt around motherhood like it is a fire I cannot get too close to for fear of getting burned. I am sorry that I cannot fake it better, even for you.

I thought yesterday that maybe we should just stop celebrating your birthday altogether. What a relief that would be. I wandered around the toy store looking for gifts to buy you, and keenly felt the pointlessness of my effort. Aisle after aisle, there is nothing left for me to buy. We own all of the toys for babies or toddlers that might interest you, and everything else is, well, not for babies or toddlers, especially one who is 90lbs and nearly as tall as my shoulder. I bought some foam blocks to add to our collection because Legos frustrate you and anyway you cannot imagine the castles or spaceships you might build, that might spirit you away. I bought a dog-shaped sprinkler for when the weather gets hot again, because you still love water as intensely as when you were a baby. There is also a Thomas & Friends train track. We will wrap your presents and you will thrill at the unknown even if you barely pay each gift itself a second thought after opening.

On my drive home from the store, a fragment of what I thought was a poem flitted through my mind: “…I put away childish things….” I thought perhaps it was Kipling, but a quick online search and I was reminded the line comes from First Corinthians, the Bible’s chapter on love.

11 | When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child. I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away childish things. 12 | For now we see in a mirror, darkly, but then face to face. Now I know in part, but then I shall know just as I also am known.

You won’t have that opportunity, I suppose, to transition into a man. You’ve just barely become a child. At six feet you may be six, if we are lucky. I don’t know what constitutes a teenager, an adult: is it merely years on the earth? Must we also have our years and our body and our mind in sync as well? Who would have thought, thirteen years ago that this would be our reality. I feared, but I couldn’t have known. I’ve stopped trying to predict our misery; and yet, holidays release a predictable, yet still relentless, wave of depression that subsumes me before I can anticipate its arrival. Even as I know that birthdays don’t change anything. Yesterday and tomorrow, we are the same.

When you turned one year old, I wrote to you in a journal I once thought you might read: “I am so ambivalent. You are not what I expected and yet you are everything. In many ways, you are as puzzling to me as you were the day you were born and yet I know you as well I know my own body.” In thirteen years, those words are as true and as bittersweet as when I wrote them. It seems that as you grow, the mirror will remain dark, and I will still only ever have a partial understanding, a glimpse, of who I am and who you are to be.

In the coming years, whether we count their passing as worthy of celebration or no, our little family will stumble along with our good intentions in the lead, hoping to get this one life right at least part of the time. Enough will have to be enough. I can forgive myself for not yet telling you it is your birthday this morning, for not throwing you a party, for not knowing how to raise you all of the days in between the years. The rules became inapplicable to us so long ago. And I can accept, because I have to, because I’ve learned I have to, that I cannot guarantee you a safe place in this world. Age will not bring you independence, but I will joyfully keep you by my side as long as I am alive to hold your hand in mine.

Perhaps every year, I should be celebrating my birth day on yours. Your birth, your life, has sculpted me in ways I innocently, naively, could never have imagined. I dreamed of castles, an idyll, but was rewarded with something more elementary. I was reinvented at your birth. And now, after thirteen years of growth, I can say with certainty I need never have worried as I did then that I wouldn’t love you. Or as the seizures came, as the disappointments came, that I couldn’t love you. If there is one star that shines brightly, inextinguishable, in the dark and fathomless sky of our future, it is love.

A Meditation, on Noah’s 12th Birthday

I woke early and put a pot of oatmeal on the stove to cook. Noah is recovering from strep, and now so am I, so we need something to eat that will be gentle on our sore throats.

I didn’t hear Noah get out of bed while I prepared breakfast. Didn’t know he was awake. Usually he cries out, wanting early morning attention, wanting help to get his iPad turned on, cold because he’s kicked his blankets off again. Instead, when I returned to the bedroom, his covers were pushed back and his space–which is exactly how “where your child once was” always feels, spacious, bereft–was empty. I had a flash as all parents do. Where is he? Where has he gone? Is he lost? Will he ever come back? Some parents feel it in the mall. Some when they have lost sight of their child in the backyard. Because Noah is never without me, my husband, or his respite sitter, I have yet to work on the muscle that all parents must strengthen: let your child off the leash of your attention; let them go out into the world without your eyes on their backs. But still, a moment out of sight has my heart jumping.

Independence is why we moved to this new house. In our old house, Noah would have awoken upstairs while I was downstairs in the kitchen. To join me, he would have had to navigate steep wooden stairs, and over the years, our caution, or warnings–“Noah, wait for me. Noah, sit down at the top of the stairs and bump down on your butt.”–had taken root and he rarely descended on his own. But this house is one story, and he occasionally will, as we’d hoped, move about the space more freely. Still, when I can’t see him, I get a jolt. Is he somewhere he could hurt himself? Is there something he could hurt himself with? Noah’s world is rife with hard surfaces and sharp edges.

I found Noah in the livingroom, sitting among his birthday presents that he opened piece by piece over the weekend. Diagnosed with strep throat on the actual celebration day, he’d had no interest in presents. And if you are one of the few people to know Noah well, you know that he loves nothing more than opening a wrapped gift. He doesn’t much care what’s in the present; he just wants to experience, I think, the mystery. What is it? Can I open it? Noah’s extended family knows to wrap a lot of gifts at Christmas. Socks. Matchbox cars. Books. Snacks. And still he’ll move on to yours. He’ll open them all, everyone’s, if he’s given the chance. Handing the opened gift to the owner holds its own revered place in the ritual too. But ultimately it is the wrapped that becomes the unwrapped that thrills him.

But this morning, his attention was pulled by the mass of 10 x 10 colorful, interlocking floor tiles we ordered and wrapped, a practical gift to be used as a mat for his playroom downstairs, to soften and warm the cold tiles of the refinished basement, to guard against risk. I stood in the doorway and watched him for a moment. Took a picture of Noah with a tile in each hand. Took a moment to feel what it must feel like to have your child play on his own; it’s a rare experience for me. To have quiet. To watch him use his body and brain to progress a concept, even if that concept is stacking floor tiles, which is what his goal seemed to be.

Noah’s need for help, for a companion, for interaction, is often a burden, one I’m certain me and my insufficient character have inflicted upon him. I’m not tough enough to force him to figure problems out on his own. I wasn’t tough enough in the face of one special needs child to have a second child, provide him with a brother or sister who would have not only been his sibling, but also his model. Sometimes Noah behaves like a dog, because the dog is sometimes his most ready mentor. When I indulge in the idyllic, I wonder how much more capable Noah would be if I’d been more brave. When I indulge in self-abuse (maybe the same thing?), I wonder why I couldn’t have found a way to be less selfish.

I’ve developed the skill over the past twelve years not to deal in the “what ifs” around Noah’s birth that circle with abandon like seagulls after a street fair. What if I had chosen to have children earlier, before my 30s? What if I hadn’t rushed back into the pursuit of pregnancy after my miscarriage, waited the recommended length of time for my hormones to reset? What if I hadn’t drunk the wine on my 33rd birthday before I knew I was pregnant again, because for some reason I’d thought it unlikely I’d get pregnant again so quickly during that time of hormonal flux. What if I’d simply decided children were not for me, and the seductive tick of my biological clock and the desire and responsibility I’d felt to make my husband a father hadn’t swayed me. Still, the “what if” of having had more children still haunts me. In this way, I know I have done life wrong. And I know I have done wrong by Noah.

Noah has made two piles of floor tiles. I suggest he might want to make more piles, sort by color. There are some days when he is up for the challenge of matching like items. I know he can do it at school as that is a kudos he receives regularly. But not today. He has tried to link one set of tiles, like puzzle pieces, but it’s too hard for him to align the tabs. He’s complicating his play in a way that would be considered dead simple by any child over the age of one: he’s crossed the room to collect more tiles to bring them over to those he has already stacked. It seems ridiculous that I’m proud he’s decided to extend his play in this way, that this is evidence that he identifies that there are more tiles to be had, that the room is big and even if he can’t see the extra tiles in front of him, he knows they are there. But it also seems like a sound observation. I am my own Jane Goodall, and I am neutral in my assessment of this rare being interacting with objects.

Noah’s world is small, his environment contained. Years of therapy have done little to expand his instincts with regard to space and possibility. There are a million small instances that I observed when he was very young that added up, like Tetris on its slowest speed, to my understanding of his natural limits. We dangled toys from the arching handle of his car seat, but he never reached out to touch them. He heard airplanes, but even if I got him to tip his head up toward the sky, he had no way of understanding where and what he was looking for. If someone calls his name, even someone he loves, who excites him, he smiles to himself rather than reacts. Some people process this as a lack of social skill; but we know his challenges are more nuanced than that. When he looks up, or to the side, his eyes twitch, a condition called nystagmus, and security and stability, comes from staying focused on what is right in front of him. When he stretches out his arm, he doesn’t seem to know where it is in space. And so, it becomes all of our responsibility to be the mountain that comes to Mohammad, and as I said above, that can be a burden when the mountain has shit to do.

It’s likely true for all children born in the early ’00s, but documenting Noah’s childhood rather rapidly changed from us pasting pictures in a baby book, to recording hand-held videos of him eating his first foods, interacting with his dogs, taking his first steps, and storing those little cassettes in a desk drawer to someday transfer onto DVDs, to movies and pictures accumulating on iPhones, ScanDisks, and out there in the cloud. It feels somehow more dismissive in Noah’s case. His progress is so slow that we’ve run out of accomplishments to document. He is twelve years old and has spent a half hour this morning stacking foam mat tiles, and I am pleased and find it a moment worthy of documentation.

I am pleased enough that I have edged into the room, seated myself on the couch with a coffee, and started to record this play session. I think to myself, if I posted this video on Facebook, it would be the most boring any of my friends could sit though if they committed themselves to it. And what would I type in the status update? “Say something about this video” the app instructs. Do I write that this video portrays Noah as he really is? That I have captured what it is like to raise a child whose progress is 13 minutes of self-motivated play regardless of what that play is? That this is as much progress as we’ve achieved in 12 years? That these moments of quiet meditation are more about me and less about him, about how I’ve fought to find an emotional equanimity that allows me to see and feel and know, but not see and feel and know too much. My practice has led me to identifying and stepping back from the edge.

Last weekend, I played in a tennis tournament, and doing so always requires me to perform some cursory small talk with my opponent before each match. And because these are women about my same age, 35-45ish, the usual topics are work and children. What do you do? Oh, that sounds interesting. Do you have kids? Yes, one son. Only one? Yes. (Some people make a sigh of regret here, which I always think is a bit presumptuous.) How old is he? Twelve. Oh, that’s a great age, does he play tennis too? No, he’s not really very coordinated. So he’s more of a video game kid? Well, he does like his movies, and he has his favorite shows. Then, does he play an instrument? No, he likes music, but is more into listening.

I prevaricate not so much any more because I’m afraid to talk about my son, afraid of the emotions that would well up unbidden, though that certainly was the case for a long time. I hedge my answers now because I hate to disappoint people. I hate to be the person who brings that into the conversation. And by that, I mean…whatever having a special needs kid might mean to that person. Maybe fear. Maybe even horror. Maybe judgment. Likely discomfort. Likely some embarrassment. Likely some sympathy. Definitely some awkwardness. Rare has been the occurrence of someone having a like story, an “I’ve been there” look to share with me. And so I deflect. Ask them about their kids, and in an about-face of my usual narcissism, I listen and ask questions. That is good practice too.

In my second tennis match of the day, my opponent told me about her two daughters, eleven and thirteen. The eldest is laid back and cool. The youngest is a drama-queen who obsesses about over-performing. She says the younger auditioned for a part in the school play and never got a callback, so spent the weekend lamenting, anguished, with her mother doing dancing-bear antics to try get her to look at the situation from a different angle. Maybe she did so well that she didn’t need to perform a second audition! (Which turned out to be true.)

While tamping down the voice in my head that wants to goad me into feeling sorry for myself because Noah will never, as I did, audition for a play, I told her I completely understood what her daughter was going through. I too was a lamenter, prone to wallow in how I understood reality, rather than choose to believe there were many more plausible scenarios than the most self-punishing and unfair one I’d settled upon, and that didn’t really change until I got much older. She asked me how I’d gotten over it. And I answered truthfully: I had children. I said, nothing teaches you that you can’t control everything more than having children. And she seemed to agree. I didn’t add that nothing teaches you that you can’t control everything more than having a special needs child.

Every parent builds, even unconsciously from a very young age, a whole infrastructure of exceptions and desires around what kind of parent he or she will be, and what kind of child he or she will raise. Even if your goal is to be the antithesis of a helicopter parent, that too is a preconceived goal. My son received a Future President onesie when he was a baby, and I happily dressed him in it. My enjoyment in seeing him wear such bravado wasn’t because I dreamed he’d someday be President, but because it felt like a symbol of his limitless potential. But that whole dreamscape that gets built over years of watching idyllic family-based sit-coms, judging your friends as they have children and raise them differently that you believe you would, worrying before you even give birth over Montessori versus traditional early education programs, and the like, forgets one thing: the child. With Noah, the only thing I can control is how well I parent him. And, at the risk of sounding the world-wearily know-it-all, that’s true for any parent, or, I believe, should be.

I’ve now recorded 13 minutes of Noah stacking floor tiles. He’s gathered them all from the furthest reaches of our living room. I’ve recorded his progress largely because it is progress, from the formation of a desire to the attainment: stack all the floor tiles into two somewhat uniform stacks. (I won’t know until a minute later that the end goal was to pick the piles up and hurtle himself and them across the room.) My son is 12 this year, and with practice I’ve learned not to hate myself, fate, a world full of expectations, or even him, like some everlasting duck-duck-goose blame game, and to sit comfortably with a reality I would never have chosen for either of us. I have this story to tell, and so I do.

I won’t tell you I’ve achieved a state of peace. I still wish we as humans didn’t celebrate birthdays at all, because then I wouldn’t have to confront what having a 12 year old with the skills of a 1-5 year old means. And I won’t tell you that fear of the future doesn’t haunt me to a degree that still occasionally dips its toe into mental instability. But I will ask you, should I ever upload the video, to watch for the full 13 minutes. To have the patience to wait it out. (Even if it’s to catch a glimpse of a black and white beasty roar-yawn his way past the screen in search of a dog treat when he hears my husband rustling in the kitchen.) Sit, and watch, and see what I get to see.

Last Night

 

The Mother Bed

Last night I put my arms around him as he lay in bed, eyes on his tablet, knees pulled up to his chest. Such long legs, getting thicker by the day, but I can still see his baby self in his skin. I’ve given him his seizure medications; I’ve washed his GTube insertion, applied Desitin, a square of gauze. I know I should tend it twice a day, but once is all the time I’ve got. I’ve dosed him with Melatonin in hopes he sleeps the night away, no tossing and turning, no cries in the night, no hours of wakefulness that have come in swaths since he was an infant.

We still share a bed even though he is eleven. You may find that inappropriate. Certainly some people do. Sure, he hasn’t had a seizure in a year and a half, thanks to the nutrition via his GTube we assume, so maybe he’d be safe on his own, but how can I know? Always our bedsharing was a necessity born out of fear. His seizures most often happened as he moved between levels of sleep. They were silent and too long, not violent and quick as most people imagine, as is often shown on TV. Instead, he just grew stiff, unresponsive. While I’d have loved to believe some kind of inner instinct would rouse me to some unusual silence across a hall, real life doesn’t often work that way. Otherwise there would be no death by middle-of-the-night fire, or while-they-slept burglaries, or children who go missing as though taken in the rapture.

What about your husband, your marriage, people ask me. And maybe I can’t explain that this is not a zero-sum game: both of us benefit from our son staying alive. The fear of SUDEP, which sounds like a cold medicine, but is how people with epilepsy sometimes die, still lingers. I have always been afraid that the one time I look away, he will suddenly disappear. Not his body, but his life. Evaporation. Ether. One time he had a seizure and I was alone with him and his lips turned blue and he stopped moving entirely, and that’s a thing that happened, and reason is no match for memory.

So bedsharing became the default, but is now a necessity because I fear the exhaustion that switching him to his own bed will bring on. When he wakes up at night, he wants a comforting hand on his back. Or a change of clothes if he pees through his night-time pull-up. Or for help finding his comfort blanket. I have grown better at falling back asleep after such disruptions, but rarely do I get a full night. When we begin to train him toward some additional independence, surely I will get even less. You may think that’s selfish, but eleven years is a long time to be tired, and sanity is a commodity I’ve learned to hoard.

I told someone today that I’d never had a driving need to be a mother, and the decision to have a baby had been more strategy than longing. On the verge of thirty, in a happy marriage with a man who deserved to be a father, I asked myself this: on my death bed, what I would regret more, not having children or having them? The answer seemed clear at the time, and so we did. (Before you ask me, we stopped at one, because he has been enough work and worry for two.)

When I hear stories of women who suffer due to childlessness, I can’t find a way to put myself in their shoes. When I hear women celebrate motherhood, they are speaking a language that sounds like my own, but the meaning gets lost in the distance between their mouths and my ear. I have a friend who has prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize faces, and that seems as good a metaphor here as any. It’s like I recognize the individual features of our common experience, but I can’t put them together to form a picture that is identifiable to me.

Simply, I don’t know what it’s like to be purely glad to have had a child. I sound cold, I know. But I can’t claim joy at having brought a child into the world who will struggle as mine struggles. That would require me to go to great length of Pollyana-ish denial, and I have far too much guilt for that. Yes, I am a better person. More compassionate, more selfless, more multi-faceted. And yes, he perfect in his imperfections. And I do often wonder when thinking about belonging, about helping him find a place in the world, if our culture is more the problem than his disabilities are. Sometimes I try to challenge people in rethinking the way they think about seizures, about special needs, that euphemism I have grown to abhor. But I would trade all of those personal gains, all of my drop-in-the-bucket activism, for having given life to a child who will be able to talk, to read, to shop, to drive, to work.

You see, I am ambivalent about being a mother, and as my child grows bigger but doesn’t truly age, I expect my feelings to remain complex on the matter. But after years of chastising myself, I now know this: it is possible to hold these two truths in my heart at the same time. There is nothing I love more than this child who I would never have decided to birth had he not appeared to me and bade me love him, like a stray at the door whose scars and ferocity are a lesson, not a reason to send it back in the rain.

I love my son most when we are quiet and I hold him in my arms and my heart, and the ache of loving him burns through me like I’ve downed a tequila shot and eaten the whole lime both. That’s not very romantic, but the visceral rarely is. Motherhood rarely is. For me, it is still poop and drool and too-sharp nails and sometimes bites and lots of embarrassment over his public behavior, and always, always, tiredness. My pride cringes as I tell you we still share the same bed. But I would take a hundred more years of all of those struggles, ironically to outlive my child whom I have always feared would die, because I have never been so afraid to leave someone I have always be destined leave.

 

In the Beginning

First, I tried ticks, their bloated bodies like blisters,
round bellies, black blood splats on the sidewalk, burst
by bicycle wheels. Then leeches, when I was ten, feet
damp in the well of the boat, water splatter as the motor
roared, slick bodies, slick, bold mouths groping, gaining
purchase. I couldn’t leave them long enough to bleed me

dry. Picking scabs only stung. Shaving legs with dull blades
run up my shin, skin shallow divots welled with wet, more
plasma than platelets, like runoff in the narrow ditches
framing the fallow fields of my father’s farm. I slid
a sharper blade along the inside of my thigh, coke-line fine,
skin paper-thin and soft like the belly of a bee. The blood

ran in rivulets, dingy windows streaked with clean. I lack
the courage to go further, palpate the pocket of my pelvis,
find the femoral vein and knife-slice it like a steak. Instead,
I write this poem, imagine I was proud, or foolish, dive deep
into this wreck, pick my bones, such meager meat. Still these
animal-lungs inflate the cage around my stupid tender heart.

Antithesis

I wrote you a love letter
but all you saw
were lines,
chicken scratchings
from my pen.

I played you a love song
but all you heard
was the hum
of strings straining
under the bow.

I gave you a gift
but all you saw
was yourself
because you forgot
to get me one.

I kissed your palm
but all you felt
was what my mouth
said out loud to you
on Tuesday.

I looked at your face
and all I saw
was twenty years
of you not knowing me
at all.

We glimpsed your death
and all we could do
was stare
it back into its cave
until spring.